PAUL DALY



With a changing British landscape at the forefront of Paul’s highly personal and experiential work, he aims to focus on and champion marginalised communities, cultural trades and traditions, the working class, and the effects of austerity through the use of analogue formats in still and moving image.

In 2018 he was one of 100 winners of The British Journal of Photography’s ‘Portrait of Brtiain’ prize and was exhibited nationwide.

Having recently finished a HOME Manchester commissioned film, Paul is currently working towards finishing his personal project ‘Mirror with a Memory’ as well as seeking new commissions and collaborations.



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Mark

4. Loren Eiseley





LE / 1957
From The Immense Journey

            A billion years have gone into the making of that eye; the water and the salt and the vapors of the sun have built it; things that squirmed in the tide silts have devised it. Light-year beyond light-year, deep beyond deep, the mind may rove by means of it, hanging above the bottomless and surveying impartially the state of matter in the white-dwarf suns.




Yet whenever I see a frog’s eye low in the water warily ogling the shoreward landscape, I always think inconsequentially of those twiddling mechanical eyes that mankind manipulates nightly from a thousand observatories. Someday, with a telescopic lens an acre in extent, we are going to see something not to out liking, some looming shape outside there across the great pond of space.
            Whenever I catch a frog’s eye I am aware of this, but I do not find it depressing. I stand quite still and try hard not to move or lift a hand since it would only frighten him. And standing thus it finally comes to me that this is the most enormous extension of vision of which life is capable: the projection of itself into other lives. This is the lonely magnificent power of humanity. It is, far more than any spatial adventure, the supreme epitome of the reaching out.
Mark